Crystal Keepers (Five Kingdoms) by Brandon Mull

Guest Book Review

downloadCrystal Keepers is an exciting, action packed book that reels you in entirely. Cole Randolph is an 11-year-old boy, who is trapped in the outskirts; a parallel universe of sorts. He, and his companions, travel to Zeropolis, the third kingdom of the five. Here he is looking for Constance, one of the lost princesses. And his enslaved friends. He’s running as an fugitive, and goes undercover. In this technologically advanced city, he faces many challenges. It was fun and exciting, it constantly keeps you engaged. Read this book!

~ Abigail B., age 16

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45 Pounds (More or Less) by Kelly Barson

downloadSixteen-year-old Ann Galardi has always had a little extra weight on her body. She is terribly self-conscious, especially in front of her body-shaming mother, who can only be described as a “chubby stick fish”, or so Ann seems to believe. When her aunt announces her wedding date, Ann declares to herself that it’s time to lose weight. And not just a few pounds… but 45 pounds. She dedicates herself to a strict, rigorous diet that induces food cravings so bad, she nearly gives up. Ann learns to survive in a world that judges almost everything, and that it’s the most satisfying feeling to accept yourself, and others, despite appearances.

The Meaning of Maggie by Megan Jean Sovern

Maggie Mayfield’s only purpose in life is to become President of the United States. That means no law breaking (liking watching R-rated movies), no crushes on boys, and only a perfect 4.0 GPA in school. On her 11th birthday, she asked for a stock in Coca-Cola. Her plea was accepted, and she proudly claimed herself, “Maggie Mayfield, member of a carbonated dynasty!” Impressive, huh? But suddenly, birthday’s are thrown pitilessly to the back of Maggie’s information-stuffed brain, for her dad’s medical condition is growing worse. He quit his job, and his legs are falling asleep. Permanently. Maggie’s long-standing belief that all of her answers are in books is impossibly twisted, because she now realizes there may be more to life than school and laws and being President. There is no known cure for her dad’s illness. Her mom has overworked herself into a “puddle of clothes on the floor,” and Maggie herself gets a B on her science project. Life is a disaster! Her “metaphorical bravery tank” is running dangerously low. But as she watches her family struggle with the “new chapter” in their lives, Maggie finally understands that there is nothing else more important than her family, because they are a team. An argumentative, occasionally dishonest, Neil Young loving team.