Read This If You Want to Take Great Photographs by Henry Carroll

GUEST BOOK REVIEW

41pclktt49l-_sx354_bo1204203200_So I got this book while strolling through an Urban Outfitters with my sister. I saw it and thought “It’s only 10 dollars, why not?” and decided to buy it. After reading and reading, I came to the conclusion that this book is pretty rad. The title just came to me as bait. Read This if You Want To Take Great Photographs is a book that does just that. But what separates it from the crowd is that the author, Henry Carroll, isn’t a tech nerd, and because of this, he talks to you not like a computer, but as a person. Carroll writes in an intimate tone, and covers mechanics of a camera throughly. He discusses camera functions so that anyone can understand. But if I had one complaint, it would probably be that you only hear about some things (like a function or lens) once and never again, forcing you to travel back looking for the page when you need a refresher. In the end, Read This if You Want To Take Great Photographs is an easy to understand, innovative take at a classic picture taking manual.

~ Raka W., age 14

Note: This book does contain some material that may be best for older readers.

From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler by E.L. Konigsburg

511Y1shNp+L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_Claudia Kincaid craved adventure, something out-of-the-blue to dishevel her normalcy. Of course, she wanted a comfortable adventure, with class and preferably money. The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City was perfect. Thus, it was only right to carefully handpick Jamie, the second youngest of her three younger brothers, the rich sibling, to accompany her. Running away wealthy was the best idea to Claudia, or so she thought. When she and her brother sneak away to the museum, they have no idea what awaits them… an intriguing mystery that is hundreds of years old. This book is one of my ultimate favorites. It is a whimsical, thoughtfully written novel for all ages and genders. Who wouldn’t want to read about what it’s like to temporarily live in a large and famous museum?

21 Proms by various authors

23013665This YA book is not your typical, dramatic book about a girl’s sparkly and full-of-fluff prom story. No, there are 21 unique and short tales of guys and ladies proms alike, written by 21 talented authors, including John Green, E. Lockhart, and Melissa de la Cruz. It’s a 289-paged read with hilarity, sincerity, and the occasional love spiel. Although it seems to aim for female readers, it’s still a staggeringly wonderful novel. I recommend it for mature readers only.

A Dog’s Life by Ann M. Martin

A-Dogs-Life-Ann-M-MartinSquirrel was born into a world where she was taught to fear humans, embrace smelly, mouthwatering garbage, and essentially, to survive. Over the years, each of these initial beliefs morphed, as she lived the experiences of the many types of dogs. The abused dog. The lonely dog. The loved dog. Follow Squirrel’s journey as she sniffs her way along the path of survival. This book is a true keeper for all ages and all dog lovers, who yearn a book simply about a dog’s life. Enjoy!

45 Pounds (More or Less) by Kelly Barson

downloadSixteen-year-old Ann Galardi has always had a little extra weight on her body. She is terribly self-conscious, especially in front of her body-shaming mother, who can only be described as a “chubby stick fish”, or so Ann seems to believe. When her aunt announces her wedding date, Ann declares to herself that it’s time to lose weight. And not just a few pounds… but 45 pounds. She dedicates herself to a strict, rigorous diet that induces food cravings so bad, she nearly gives up. Ann learns to survive in a world that judges almost everything, and that it’s the most satisfying feeling to accept yourself, and others, despite appearances.